Logotipo Empresa
Logotipo Empresa

NOTICIAS

 Fèlix Tena Cornelles firma su obra en la 53 edición de la Fira del LLibre en Valencia
Durante este fin de semana y dentro de la 53 edición de la Fira del llibre de València, Fèlix Tena ha firmado ejemplares de su obra Un mòn sostenible? R ...

 

Ver más...
Presentación en TVE de la obra Homme Postmoderne de Antonio Camaró
El pintor Antonio Camaró y Vicente Lafora, editor de Albatros Ediciones, han presentado este Domingo, en Televisión Española, la obra "L´homme Postm ...

 

Ver más...
Presentación de la edición
El pasado 19 de abril dentro de las jornadas anuales  organizadas por la Universidad de  Kentucky en Lexington, KY,  "The Languages Literatures and Cultures Con ...

 

Ver más...
Nota de prensa de la edición
  Albatros Ediciones publica el libro del célebre filósofo y escritor italiano, Riccardo Campa, “Cervantes. La Línea del Horizonte”.   ...

 

Ver más...
Entrega de la nueva publicación
D. Vicente Lafora Minguet editor de Albatros Ediciones-Artes Gráficas Soler, S. L., en su promoción de las nuevas publicaciones de la Editorial Albatros, entreg ...

 

Ver más...
Entrega de publicaciones al Secretario General de la Sociedad Estatal de Desarrollo e Inversión de Extremadura
D. Vicente Lafora Minguet editor de Albatros Ediciones-Artes Gráficas Soler, S. L., en su promoción de las nuevas publicaciones de la Editorial Albatros, entreg&oa ...

 

Ver más...
Entrega al Ministro Plenipotenciario de la Embajada de Qatar en España Jaber Al-Marri de litografías y libro
D. Vicente Lafora Minguet editor de Albatros Ediciones-Artes Gráficas Soler, S. L., en su promoción de la edición "L'homme postmoderne", hace entre ...

 

Ver más...
Entrega al Embajador de Qatar de la edición El Hombre postmoderno
D. Vicente Lafora editor de Albatros Ediciones-Artes Gráficas Soler, hace entrega de  litografías de dos cuadros y libro realizadas por Ediciones Albatros/Artes ...

 

Ver más...
Colaboración con el pintor valenciano Antonio Camaró
PROYECTO EL HOMBRE POST-MODERNO  El cuadro L’homme postmoderne es una crítica al hombre post-moderno; hombre individual y egoísta, que sólo se mi ...

 

Ver más...
Nueva publicación en dos idiomas. Gálvez y España en la Guerra de Independencia de los Estados Unidos
La editorial Albatros Ediciones con el apoyo de la Comisión Española de Historia Militar (CEHISMI) del Centro Superior de Estudios de la Defensa Nacional (CESEDEN), h ...

 

Ver más...
NUEVA COLECCION
La editorial valenciana Albatros Ediciones ha incluído en su dilatada línea editorial la serie Palabras de América. Esta iniciativa nació en ...

 

Ver más...
NUEVA PUBLICACION COLECCION HISTORIA DE ESPAÑA.THE BATTLE OF KINSALE
Nueva publicación de la colección Historia de España y su proyección internacional.   The Battle of Kinsale. 1601-1602 Study and Documents from ...

 

Ver más...
Entrega de un ejemplar al Sr. Embajador de Irlanda y al Ministro irlandés de Educación Sr. Ruairi Quinn
ALBATROS EDICIONES presentó el pasado 25 de octubre dos nuevas publicaciones de su colección HISTORIA DE ESPAÑA Y SU PROYECCIÓN INTERNACIONAL. Cont&oacu ...

 

Ver más...

Colección Historia de España

The Spanish Monarchy and Safavid Persia in the Early Modern Period.

Home Obra Autores
  • The Spanish Monarchy and Safavid Persia in the Early Modern Period.

DISTRIBUIDORES

MARCIAL PONS

MAIDHISA

DISTRIBUIDORES

MARCIAL PONS

MAIDHISA

DISTRIBUIDORES

MARCIAL PONS

MAIDHISA

PVP 
30.00 EUROS

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Rudi Matthee

University of Delaware

 

 

How to conceptualise the early modern Mediterranean Sea – whether to stress its physical and environmental unity or to focus on its diversity to the point of emphasising the religious antagonism and civilisational conflict it frequently witnessed – is an issue that has exercised historians of this storied body of water in ways that have no parallel with regard to any other globally significant sea or ocean. The Belgian historian Henri Pirenne in 1937 famously postulated that the seventh and eighth-century Muslim expansion into the Mediterranean basin disrupted its previously existing Christian unity and hastened its commercial stagnation and decline, leaving it divided between two hostile civilisations staring at each other from across the sea1. Twelve years later Fernand Braudel no less famously described a ‘long’ sixteenth-century pan-Mediterranean world of geographical and environmental unity, paying but scant attention to differences in culture and creed among the people who lived on its shores and sailed its waters2. In Braudel’s Mediterranean of cultural neutrality, religious and political conflict was subordinated to a glacial, long-term evolution of age-old patterns of life.

Braudel’s image of the early modern Mediterranean Sea as a unified basin where near-permanence prevailed and change was a matter of the longue-durée has exerted a powerful influence on subsequent research. But it has not remained uncontested. The unity of Braudel’s Mediterranean was first and foremost physical in origin and nature, and to the extent that there was a human element to it, it was Latin in make-up and orientation – a reversal, in a way, to the conditions Pirenne had started out with. As yet unable to draw on research grounded in Ottoman archival sources, Braudel perforce emphasised the influence of ‘Western Mediterranean civilization’. By his own admission, Islam was largely absent from his work, and the human unity he identified was mostly the unity of Latin Christendom dominating its northern shores, at the expense of the southern and eastern rim.   

Andrew Hess was one of the first to take up this challenge. In The Forgotten Frontier, Hess reinserted conflict springing from deeply held faith as a fundamental motivating force behind the endemic conflict of the early modern Mediterranean. He introduced the idea of an Ibero-African frontier, the western end of the Mediterranean, where ‘Latin Christendom and Islam had commingled since the eighth century’. He spoke of this frontier as an arena of ‘cultural collision’, and argued that the early modern era was a period ‘when the divisions between Mediterranean civilizations became more important’.....

 

Volver Arriba